We strongly support the goals of the Paris Agreement to limit the rise in the average global temperature well below 2° Celsius. The Paris Agreement also said the world should pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5° Celsius.

For society to achieve a 1.5° Celsius future, the world is likely to need to stop adding to the stock of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere – a state known as net-zero emissions – by around 2060. 

That is why Shell has set itself an ambition to become, by 2050 or sooner, a net-zero emissions energy business.

This is accompanied by our ambition, by 2030, to provide a reliable electricity supply to 100 million people in the developing world.

*Shell Scenarios are part of an ongoing process used in Shell for 40 years to challenge executives on the future business environment. We base them on plausible assumptions and quantification, and they are designed to stretch management to consider even events that may be only remotely possible. Scenarios, therefore, are not intended to be predictions of likely future events or outcomes and investors should not rely on them when making an investment decision with regard to Royal Dutch Shell plc securities.

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The Paris agreement: can it survive?

It is crucial that the Paris agreement remains in place, says Shell’s Chief Climate Change Advisor David Hone. It underpins the need for the ongoing energy transition to also deliver a world of net-zero emissions.

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