Shell today announces a programme to invest in natural ecosystems as part of its strategy to act on global climate change, including addressing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions generated by customers when using its products. Shell plans to invest $300 million over the next three years.

This programme will contribute to Shell’s three-year target, beginning in 2019, to reduce its Net Carbon Footprint by 2% – 3%.

“There is no single solution to tackling climate change. A transformation of the global energy system is needed, from electricity generation to industry and transport,” said Ben van Beurden, Chief Executive Officer of Royal Dutch Shell.

“Shell will play its part. Our focus on natural ecosystems is one step we are taking today to support the transition towards a low-carbon future. This comes in addition to our existing efforts, from reducing the carbon intensity of oil and gas operations to investments in renewable sources of energy.”

Mark Tercek, CEO of The Nature Conservancy, said: “Last year’s IPCC report was a wake-up call on climate: reducing emissions starts with fossil fuels. Shell’s announcement signals that one of the world’s biggest energy companies is pursuing a decarbonisation strategy with a broad set of solutions, including by investing in nature. By doing so, it is helping to curb global deforestation, restore vital ecosystems, and help communities develop sustainably. Shell is the first in the industry to set near-term targets for the emissions of both its operations and its products; this is clear progress, but it also illustrates how much work remains to achieve Paris climate targets. We look forward to seeing further investment from Shell in these areas.”

On the road, Shell is making a wider range of transport solutions available to customers. The company is stepping up its investments in lower-carbon options, from battery electric vehicle charging to liquefied natural gas and hydrogen. For example, in Europe, customers can now access 100,000 electric vehicle charge points through New Motion, a Shell company. Today, Shell announces that it is also investing in 200 new rapid electric vehicle charge-points, powered by renewable energy, on its forecourts in the Netherlands, on top of 500 ultra-fast chargers being installed on Shell forecourts across Europe, in partnership with IONITY. 

For customers who drive internal combustion engine vehicles, Shell is making it simpler for them to reduce their carbon footprint through low-carbon biofuels and carbon neutral driving.

From April 17th, customers who fill up at a Shell service station in the Netherlands will be able to drive carbon neutral through the use of nature-based carbon credits. This will be done at no extra cost for customers who choose Shell V-Power petrol or diesel, while those who fill up with regular Shell petrol or diesel can participate for an additional 1 cent a litre.

Shell will roll out similar choices to customers in other countries, starting with the UK later this year. This complements Shell’s existing programme to help business customers avoid or reduce emissions, including supplying lower emission fuels and electric vehicle charging. Shell also offers businesses the opportunity to drive carbon neutral by compensating the CO2 emitted from driving their fleet.

CO2 emissions generated by participating motorists – as well as from the extraction, refining and distribution of the fuel – will be offset by carbon credits. As one of the most established traders of carbon credits in the world, Shell buys these credits from a global portfolio of nature-based projects, including Cordillera Azul National Park Project in Peru, Katingan Peatland Restoration and Conservation Project in Indonesia and GreenTrees Reforestation Project in the USA. Each carbon credit is subject to a third-party verification process and represents the avoidance or removal of 1 tonne of CO2.

At the same time, Shell also plans to invest at scale in forests, wetlands and other natural ecosystems around the world, to reduce emissions and capture more CO2 while benefitting biodiversity and local communities.

As a start, in the Netherlands, Shell and Staatsbosbeheer, the independent Dutch state forestry service, will plant more than 5 million trees over the next 12 years. “This collaboration enables Staatsbosbeheer to plant new trees in the forests following the death of ash trees affected by an aggressive fungal disease,” said Sylvo Thijsen, Chief Executive of Staatsbosbeheer.

Shell has also signed a deal with Land Life Company to create a 300-hectare reforestation project in Spain. Around 300,000 trees will be planted in the Castilla y Leon region by the end of this year. “We welcome Shell’s investment in high quality nature-based solutions to address climate change and rebuild critical ecosystems,“ said Jurriaan Ruys, CEO of Land Life Company. “Combined with a technology-driven approach, reforestation can now be achieved and optimised at scale, maximising the impact of this investment.” The projects in the Netherlands and Spain are expected to generate carbon credits within five years.

In addition, in Queensland, Australia, Shell has established an 800-hectare endangered native forest regeneration project. In Malaysia, Shell and the Sarawak state government are jointly studying the potential for a nature conservation, restoration and enhancement venture for Sarawak’s natural landscape.

Enquiries:

Shell Media Relations
International: +44 207 934 5550
Netherlands: +31 70 377 8750

Notes To Editors:

Further information on Shell’s Net Carbon Footprint ambition.

  • Further information on Shell’s investments in natural ecosystems and carbon neutral driving – infographics, images, and video. www.shell.com/naturebasedsolutions
  • The protection, or redevelopment, of natural ecosystems – such as forests, grasslands, peatlands and wetlands – leads to lower concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Such activities can also result in the creation, marketing, trading and sale of carbon credits. They also help deliver many other benefits, including improvements in biodiversity, water quality, flood protection and livelihoods.
  • A peer-reviewed paper co-authored by a number of universities and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) – including the Nature Conservancy and Wetlands International – has estimated that, even accounting for cost constraints, supporting such initiatives could reduce CO2 emissions by more than 11 billion tonnes per year by 2030 – equivalent to the combined emissions of the USA and the European Union.
  • The GreenTrees Reforestation Project is reforesting one million acres of marginal farmland in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. To date they have planted over 42 million trees on 120,000 acres, in partnership with private landowners.
  • The Katingan Peatland Restoration and Conservation Project not only reduces emissions but protects and conserves biodiversity and enables sustainable development of local communities. In recognition, the project has received triple gold Climate, Community and Biodiversity status.
  • The Cordillera Azul National Park Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) Project is designed to transform the local communities and ecosystems. Project revenue from carbon credits help drive the development of alternative livelihoods and climate friendly productive activities such as agriculture, textiles, and crafts. In recognition, the project has Biodiversity Gold Level Climate, Community and Biodiversity status.
  • Shell supplies business customers in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Luxembourg and the Netherlands lower emission fuels and the option to drive carbon neutral. We also offer electric vehicle charging for our business customers in Belgium, France, Germany and the Netherlands.
  • The terms “carbon neutral”, “carbon off-set” or “carbon off-set compensation” indicate that Shell has engaged in a transaction to ensure that an amount of carbon dioxide equivalent to that associated with the production, delivery and usage of the fuel has been removed from the atmosphere through a nature-based process or emissions saved through avoided deforestation.

Royal Dutch Shell plc

Royal Dutch Shell plc is incorporated in England and Wales, has its headquarters in The Hague and is listed on the London, Amsterdam, and New York stock exchanges. Shell companies have operations in more than 70 countries and territories with businesses including oil and gas exploration and production; production and marketing of liquefied natural gas and gas to liquids; manufacturing, marketing and shipping of oil products and chemicals and renewable energy projects. For further information, visit www.shell.com.

Cautionary Note

The companies in which Royal Dutch Shell plc directly and indirectly owns investments are separate legal entities. In this release “Shell”, “Shell group” and “Royal Dutch Shell” are sometimes used for convenience where references are made to Royal Dutch Shell plc and its subsidiaries in general. Likewise, the words “we”, “us” and “our” are also used to refer to subsidiaries in general or to those who work for them. These expressions are also used where no useful purpose is served by identifying the particular company or companies. ‘‘Subsidiaries’’, “Shell subsidiaries” and “Shell companies” as used in this release refer to companies over which Royal Dutch Shell plc either directly or indirectly has control. Entities and unincorporated arrangements over which Shell has joint control are generally referred to as “joint ventures” and “joint operations” respectively. Entities over which Shell has significant influence but neither control nor joint control are referred to as “associates”. The term “Shell interest” is used for convenience to indicate the direct and/or indirect ownership interest held by Shell in a venture, partnership or company, after exclusion of all third-party interest.

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Also, in this release we may refer to “Shell’s Net Carbon Footprint”, which includes Shell’s carbon emissions from the production of our energy products, our suppliers’ carbon emissions in supplying energy for that production and our customers’ carbon emissions associated with their use of the energy products we sell. Shell only controls its own emissions but, to support society in achieving the Paris Agreement goals, we aim to help and influence such suppliers and consumers to likewise lower their emissions. The use of the terminology “Shell’s Net Carbon Footprint” is for convenience only and not intended to suggest these emissions are those of Shell or its subsidiaries.

With respect to operating costs synergies indicated, such savings and efficiencies in procurement spend include economies of scale, specification standardisation and operating efficiencies across operating, capital and raw material cost areas.

We may have used certain terms, such as resources, in this release that United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) strictly prohibits us from including in our filings with the SEC. U.S. Investors are urged to consider closely the disclosure in our Form 20-F, File No 1-32575, available on the SEC website www.sec.gov.

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