Spin training for GA pilots.

Video Vignettes - Aeroshell Maintenance Answer Videos
Aerobatics

Spin training for GA pilots

 

Vision:

[AeroShell Winged pecten]

[Text] AeroShell answers

Ben Visser and David Martin walking towards camera

Speech: Ben Visser

You know, when most pilots say they want to take a plane out for a spin, they don’t mean it literally.

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[Text] Ben Visser, AeroShell, David Martin, US Aerobatic Team

Speech: Ben Visser

I’d like you to meet David Martin, a member of the US Aerobatic Team.

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David Martin

Speech: David Martin

When most people think of aerobatics, they automatically think of great performances by the US Unlimited and Eagles Aerobatic Teams. But there’s a lot more to it than that. For example, the US Aerobatic Teams

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IAC logo

Speech: David Martin

and members of the International Aerobatic Club, the IAC, are working with other organisations to develop spin avoidance and recovery procedures, and training programmes for all pilots. These programmes are being presented through your local certified flight instructor, and will make you a better general aviation pilot. The first part of this programme should be available for presentation here at Air Venture 2000 in Oshkosh. There are a number of ways you can get involved with aerobatics.

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[Text] Support the US Aerobatic Team.

[AeroShell winged pecten]

Speech: David Martin

You can start by supporting the US Aerobatic Teams.

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Aeroplane aerobatics

Speech: David Martin

We’ll be representing the US in world competitions in Europe later this summer. The unlimited, advanced and glider teams are made up of some of the best aerobatic pilots in the world. We spend countless hours practising and training for these competitions,

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Ben Visser and David Martin

Speech:

and we certainly appreciate your support.

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[Text] Get involved with IAC.

[AeroShell winged pecten]

Speech: Ben Visser

You can also become involved in your IAC chapter as a volunteer, a spectator or even a participant.

Vision:

Ben Visser

Speech: Ben Visser

There are many levels of competition from basic all the way up to the unlimited level. It’s a lot of fun and you meet a lot of great people who also enjoy aviation.

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[Text] Take spin avoidance or spin training.

[AeroShell winged pecten]

Speech: Ben Visser

Finally, you should consider taking spin avoidance or even spin training.

Vision:

Ben Visser

Speech: Ben Visser

Most pilots get very tense and nervous at the mention of a spin or even unusual altitude but, believe me, it’s not that scary. In fact it took me a few minutes, but I got to where I kind of enjoyed it. And besides, wouldn’t you rather learn about unusual altitudes in a controlled environment with a certified instructor along to help you out and talk you through it than try and figure it out by yourself under less than optimum conditions? I know I would. I have. I’m Ben Visser. Good flying.

Maintenance of baffles and seals on your aircraft.

Transcript

Video Vignettes - Aeroshell Maintenance Answer Videos

Baffles

Maintenance of baffles and seals on your aircraft


Vision:
[AeroShell Winged pecten]

[Text] AeroShell answers

Ben Visser

[Text] Ben Visser, Shell Oil Products Company

Speech: Ben Visser

Now here’s a baffling problem. Actually it’s a problem that’s often overlooked. It involves the baffles and seals of your aircraft. Both are critical to cooling your engine.

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Diagram of engine on flip chart: different components indicated by Ben Visser.

Speech: Ben Visser

When an aircraft is flying, air is forced into the cowling, creating the static pressure above the engine. This forces cooling air down through the cylinders and through the oil cooler to lower pressure areas below and to the rear of the engine. This air is then forced out through the cowling or other flowing openings.

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Ben Visser holding baffle

Speech: Ben Visser

If your baffles are broken and misshaped they can increase the amount of air going passed a particular cylinder or area of your engine. Now, there’s only a given amount of air coming into the cowling for a given aircraft at a given condition.

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Ben Visser points to an aircraft engine

Speech: Ben Visser

So if you increase the air flow in one area then air flow passed other areas will decrease. This means the oil cooler and some cylinders aren’t getting the air they need. Seals can create similar problems. If your seals aren’t in good condition or if they aren’t properly adjusted, they allow air to bleed out. This reduces the static pressure and cooling. So what can you do?

Vision:

Close up of aircraft engine

Speech: Ben Visser

Whenever you install a new engine, always check the baffles. As part of your periodic inspection or if the cylinder head temperatures seem abnormally high, check all seals for fit and condition. If the seals aren’t soft and pliable, replace them. Look to see how the seals fit against the cowling.

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Ben Visser

Speech: Ben Visser

If there are noticeable gaps, adjust the seals to reduce air leakage.

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Close up of aircraft engine

Speech: Ben Visser

Inspect the holes at the rear of the cowling for excessive leakage as well. If your cylinder head temps still run hot,

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Ben Visser

Speech: Ben Visser

you may need to have the static pressure above the engine checked during flight. The specs should be available from the airframe manufacturer. Checking baffles and seals is just as critical for smaller aircraft. It’s a simple way to keep your cool. I’m Ben Visser. Good flying.

Maintenance tips for your propeller.

Transcript

Video Vignettes - Aeroshell Maintenance Answer Videos

Propellers

Maintenance tips for your propeller

 

Vision:

[AeroShell Winged pecten]

[Text] AeroShell answers

Ben Visser with propeller

Speech: Ben Visser

Well, I guess that makes sense.

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[Text] Ben Visser [winged pecten] AeroShell

Speech: Ben Visser

I was running through the prop department and I found this, which is great because I want to talk to you about props. You know by and large propellers are very dependable and don’t require a lot of attention. However, there are a few things you should always remember.

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[Text]

  1. Have your prop inspected.
  2. Fulfill A.D. notes.
  3. Follow manufacturer’s checklist

[AeroShell Winged pecten]

Speech: Ben Visser

For example, you should always have your prop inspected by a qualified mechanic and fulfil all AD notes issued by the manufacturer. And always follow the manufacturer’s checklist.

Vision:

Aircraft propeller

Speech: Ben Visser

With fixed-pitch props like this one there are very few things that can go wrong, but it’s still very important to check for nicks on the leading edge and for poor-quality paint or signs of corrosion.

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Ben Visser with propeller

Speech: Ben Visser

Most propeller tips are going fairly close to the speed of sound during flight. This means the blades are under a very high load and even a small crack or nick can lead to a severe failure.

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Instrument panel inside cockpit

Speech: Ben Visser

I would also suggest you limit the rpm as much as possible

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Aircraft taking off

Speech: Ben Visser

when you’re taxiing on or near loose gravel or other objects than can damage your prop.

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Ben Visser with propeller

Speech: Ben Visser

All propellers should be kept clean, but constant-speed propellers like this one require additional care to ensure trouble-free operation. Never use a pressure washer to clean your prop. A pressure washer can force water passed the blade seals. This can displace the lubricant and increase the wear and corrosion of the blades. So always clean all props using the proper procedure and solvents.

Vision:

Aircraft propeller being checked

Speech: Ben Visser

When pre-flighting your constant-speed prop, you should also check for signs of nicks or corrosion. Always check the prop seals for signs of a leak and check the blades and spinners for tightness and excessive run out. There should be very little movement in the blades

Vision:

Ben Visser

Speech: Ben Visser

and they should all feel about the same. Remember prop failures are very rare but they are also usually a lot more difficult to handle than even an engine failure. So always check your prop and follow the manufacturer’s checklist.

Vision:

Ben Visser with propeller

Speech: Ben Visser

OK, now let’s check that spinner. I’m Ben Visser. Good flying.