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From an early age John had a strong interest in electronics. Later he decided to study the physics behind it. He graduated in 1991 from The Ohio State University with a PhD in condensed matter physics. While studying he became fascinated by the energy industry.

After university John joined Shell as a member of Bellaire Research Center team in Houston the USA. The team was developing ways to unlock resources of oil sands and oil trapped in shale by using heaters to crack the heavy oil into lighter fractions.

John has worked in reservoir engineering for over 19 years, helping to develop advanced models of below the Earth’s surface and advising on the design and operation of field tests – he holds more than 70 patents.

Currently John is a Technology Advisor at the Unconventional Technologies department and was appointed Chief Scientist Reservoir Engineering in 2010.

In his spare time John likes to read – particularly about technology and business – and he also enjoys the cinema.

Video testimonial

Shell Chief Scientist Reservoir Engineering John Karanikas talks about using advanced mathematical modelling to learn more  about rock and fluid properties and how this, combined with novel technologies, is helping to unlock vast resources of hard-to-produce oil and gas.

John’s favourite bookmarks

Shell Chief Scientist Reservoir Engineering John Karanikas talks about using advanced mathematical modelling to learn more  about rock and fluid properties and how this, combined with novel technologies, is helping to unlock vast resources of hard-to-produce oil and gas.