Students from Asia Pacific, Middle East and Australia have conquered the streets around Rizal Park, Manila to set four new mileage records in the last edition of Shell Eco-marathon Asia to be held in the Philippine city. Team how much Ethanol from Panjavidhya Technological College, Thailand clinched first place in the Prototype Alternative Fuel category with a mileage of 2,040km/l at the street circuit – the approximate equivalent distance between Manila and Bangkok. Team Sadewa from Universitas Indonesia more than doubled last year’s winning result and recorded 275km/l in the UrbanConcept Shell FuelSave Gasoline category.

“We are so happy and thrilled to have won. We have been working in this vehicle for 3 years. We were 100% confident going into this competition and knew we would win. We were previously the champions in 2014, and we think our winning feature is our variable valve timing. We made many friends here from different countries although we don’t speak English, so we are very happy.” said Jutarat Bunrak, member of team how much Ethanol.

Other teams that have achieved new mileage records include Clean Diesel Team from Japan, who bested their previous record with a recorded mileage of 1,424km/l in their Prototype vehicle on ethanol. Team UiTM Eco-Sprint from Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM) Shah Alam Malaysia also bettered their own winning result last year to champion the Prototype Hydrogen Fuel Cell category again with a record mileage of 476 km/m3.

This year will see the most significant change to Shell Eco-marathon since the competition began 30 years ago, with the introduction of the Drivers’ World Championship. Drivers will go head-to-head in a traditional racing car format whilst maintaining the need to drive efficiently, at the end of which the winning team will earn an invite to spend one week with Scuderia Ferrari at their factory in Italy. Once in Maranello, they will meet the team and receive personal coaching and advice from the engineers on how they can improve their car for the 2017 Shell Eco-marathon.

Based on this year’s results, four UrbanConcept teams have qualified for the Drivers’ World Championship, held at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London later this year.

Qualified teams include three teams from Indonesia, Team Sadewa from Universitas Indonesia, ITS Team 2 from Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, and Team Bumi siliwangi team 4 from Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia. DLSU Eco Car Team - Battery Electric from De La Salle University in Philippines also qualified to compete at the Drivers’ World Championship. Team NTU 3D-Printed Car from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore has also been invited to compete at the event as a wildcard entrant.

“The Shell Eco-marathon Drivers’ World Championship Race marks an important step in the evolution of Shell Eco-marathon and the global drive for energy efficiency, challenging the students to push further than they have before,” said Norman Koch, Shell Eco-marathon Global Technical Director. “I’m extremely excited to see five teams from Shell Eco-marathon Asia clock strong mileage results in order to qualify for the Drivers’ World Championship at Make The Future London, and I look forward to seeing them compete against the best in the world.”

This year’s winners bested 117 student teams from 17 countries across Asia, the Middle East and Australia. Teams submitted vehicle entries in either the Urban Concept or Prototype category in any of the seven different energy types. Results are measured on who can drive the furthest on the equivalent of 1 kWh or 1 litre of fuel.

Five Off-Track Awards Presented to Outstanding Student Teams

In addition to the 24 On-Track awards, teams also competed for five Off-Track Awards that tested their technical and creative skills, as well as their approach to safety and sustainability. A panel of experts from various fields judged the students on a variety of categories that covered Communications, Vehicle Design, Technical Innovation, Safety, and Perseverance and Spirit of the Event.

Two student teams from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore won four of the five off-track awards, with Team NTU 3D-Printed Car bringing home the Communications and Safety awards. They share the Vehicle Design award with Team NSTRU Eco-Racing from Nakhon Si Thammarat Rajabhat University, Thailand.

“It has been an amazing experience for us this year. We had only hoped to achieve a valid run on track this year, but our perseverance has truly paid off as we not only met, but exceed our own expectations,” said Ahmad Ibrahim bin Mohammad Taha, a team member of Team NTU 3D-Printed Car. “We began this project as a test-bed to show that 3-D printing can be applied to large-scale creations, and we are glad that we have also inspired other teams at the competition to do the same.”

Team Nanyang E-Drive received the award for Technical Innovation for their application of a unique battery fire suppression system. It utilises CO2 to prevent the battery from igniting as a result of overheating. This self-created technology – which was partly devised using a guitar string – was simple, effective and robust in ensuring that both the driver and the vehicle remained safe while it was on the track.

“We are so glad and really appreciate that our self-built fire suppressant system was recognised and that the competition saw the value in this. We will definitely explore other aspects of safety that we can improve on, and hope to return with more technological innovations,” said Shiwei Foo, Nanyang E-Drive Team Leader.

The fifth off-track award winner was Team BITS from Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), India, who won the Perseverance and Spirit of the Event award.


Shell Eco-marathon Asia welcomed close to 30,000 members of the public over the span of four days, who got up close to the student competition and watched live performances at the Fan Zone. Visitors were also treated to a captivating and educational adventure into the future of energy, cities and sustainability at the Energy Zone, and enjoyed an outdoor festival where they were able to participate in activities and grab a bite to eat.

Overview of Shell Eco-marathon Asia 2016 winners

Prototype Category

Hydrogen

Rank Team Name  Country School Name Fuel type

Best attempt

(km/m3)

1 UiTM Eco-Sprint Malaysia University Teknologi Mara (UiTM) Shah Alam Hydrogen 476km/m3
2 Eco-Voyager Malaysia University of Malaya Hydrogen 244km/m3

Battery-electric

Rank Team Name Country School Name Fuel type

Best attempt

(km/kWh)

1 NSTRU Eco-Racing Thailand Nakhon Si Thammarat Rajabhat University Battery- electric 507km/kWh
2 BIT Econopower Club China Beijing Institute of Technology Battery- electric 442km/kWh
3 Nanyang E Drive Singapore Nanyang Technological University Battery- electric 425km/kWh

Petrol (gasoline) Fuel

Rank Team name Country School Name Fuel type

Best attempt

(km/l)

1 Nakoela Indonesia Universitas Indonesia Gasoline 792km/l
2 Aguila Philippines Mapua Institute of Technology Gasoline 335km/l
3 HaUI AUTO Vietnam Hanoi University of Industry Gasoline 326km/l

Diesel Fuel

Rank

Team name Country School Name Fuel type

Best attempt

(km/l)

1 Clean Diesel Team Japan Hyogo Prefectural Tajima Technical Institute Diesel 1424km/l
2 Zeal Eco-power proto China Tongji University Diesel 798km/l
3 Team Lahutay 4 Philippines University of San Carlos Diesel 106km/l

Alternative Fuel

Rank Team name Country School Name Fuel type

Best attempt

(km/l)

1 How much Ethanol Thailand Panjavidhya Technological College Ethanol 2040km/l
2 Luk Jao Mae Khlong Prapa Ethnol Thailand Dhurakij Pubdit University Ethanol 710km/l
3 Deakin Prototype Australia Deakin University Ethanol 528km/l

CNG

Rank

Team name Country School Name Fuel type

Best attempt

(km/l)

1 Eco-Chaser Malaysia Monash University, Malaysia CNG 95km/l

Urbanconcept Category

Hydrogen

Rank Team name Country School Name Fuel type

Best attempt

(km/m3)

1 UiTM Eco-Planet Malaysia Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM) Shah Alam Hydrogen 91km/m3

Battery-electric

Rank Team name Country School Name Fuel type

Best attempt

(km/kWh)

1 DLSU Eco Car Team - Battery-electric Philippines De La Salle University Battery-electric 78km/kWh
2 Bumi siliwangi team 4 Indonesia Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia Battery-electric 78km/kWh
3 NTU Singapore 3D-Printed Car Singapore Nanyang Technological University Battery-electric 77km/kWh

Petrol (gasoline) Fuel

Rank Team name Country School Name Fuel type

Best attempt

(km/l)

1 Sadewa Indonesia Universitas Indonesia Gasoline 275km/l
2 DLSU Eco Car Team - I.C.E. Philippines De La Salle University Gasoline 159km/l
3 CKÐ - MIN10 Vietnam Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology and Education Gasoline 109km/l

Diesel Fuel

Rank Team Name Country School Name Fuel Type

Best attempt

(km/l)

1 ITS Team 2 Indonesia Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember Diesel 250km/l
2 Bengawan Team 2 Indonesia Sebelas Maret University Diesel 139km/l

Alternative Fuel

Rank Team Name Country School Name Fuel Type

Best attempt

(km/l)

1 LH - Gold Energy Vietnam Lac Hong University Ethanol 186km/l
2 Cikal Ethanol Indonesia Institut Teknologi Bandung Ethanol 184km/l
3 Horas Mesin Indonesia University of Sumatera Utara Ethanol 123km/l

Off-Track Awards Winners:

Communications

Team Nanyang 3D-Printed Car

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Team Nanyang 3D-Printed Car harnessed the strategic value of media engagement and social amplification by hosting their own event to engage local media, which also resulted in international media attention. In addition, the team also employed a social media strategy that extended beyond their own social channels, by engaging with niche technology online communities in Singapore to encourage further word-of-mouth on their team and car. The same team is also the winner of the Vehicle Design and Safety awards.

Vehicle Design

Team NSTRU Eco-Racing

Nakhon Si Thammarat Rajabhat University, Thailand

Team NSTRU Eco-Racing won for their full monocoque chassis and professional-looking design which was lightweight, clean and compact. They employed a centrepetal-based drivetrain system which allowed for coasting with no drag, which was simple yet effective. The full construction of the vehicle was made in-house by the students which keeps to the spirit of the competition – driving innovation to achieve sustainable mobility.

Team Nanyang 3D-Printed Car

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Team Nanyang 3D-Printed Car impressed with their innovative 3-D printed ABS plastic blocks to form the body of their vehicle, which was hailed as an ingenious and cost-effective technique that has potential application in vehicle production. All electronics within the vehicle were also properly insulated and used CANBUS wiring which resulted in less wiring and easy diagnostics, allowing for ease of maintenance and high speed connectivity. The same team is also the winner of the Communications and Safety awards.

Technical Innovation

Team Nanyang E-Drive      

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Team Nanyang E-Drive impressed with the application of a unique battery fire suppression system which utilises CO2 to prevent the battery from igniting as a result of overheating. This self-created technology – which was partly devised using a guitar string – was simple, effective and robust in ensuring that both the driver and the vehicle remained safe while it was on the track. As more hybrid vehicles are produced for everyday usage, the ability to manage battery safety becomes more of a front focus, and this technology could soon be applied to commercially manufactured cars. 

Safety

Team Nanyang 3D-Printed Car

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Team Nanyang 3D-Printed Car impressed with their consistency in upholding safety as a priority in everything that they did. From the design and production of their vehicle, to the manner of how they operated within the paddock, they showcased a culture of safety that has been instilled in each and every one of their team members. The same team is also the winner this year of the Communications and Technical Innovation awards.

Perseverance and Spirit of the Event

Team BITS

Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), India

Team BITS showed great resilience and perseverance despite facing multiple setbacks from even before they had left their home country for the event in Manila. Despite the lack of support – both financially and morally – from their school and families back home, they remained positive and chose to move forward amidst all the challenges faced, and were focused on preparing whatever they could for their car. The team demonstrated that the event is not just about winning, but is also a platform for them to pursue their passions.

Shell Eco-marathon 2016 shows Shell’s commitment to helping the world meet its growing energy needs in a responsible way, bringing together students, partners and the public.  It is held in partnership with the Philippine Government Department of Tourism and the City of Manila. Its Global Partners include HP (Official Global Information Technology (IT) Partner), Michelin (Official Global Paddock Partner and Tyre Supplier), The Linde Group (Official Global Paddock Partner) and Southwest Research Institute (Official Global Paddock Partner). Private sector partners are Coca-Cola FEMSA Philippines, Globe Business, Hyundai, Isla LPG Corporation, Jollibee, Meralco, PolyKlear and Unilever Philippines.

For more information on all Shell Eco-marathon events across the globe, including official rules, instructions for registration and details on prizes, please visit the Shell Eco-marathon website at www.shell.com/ecomarathon.

NOTE TO EDITORS:

To access event images, please visit the following URL: https://www.flickr.com/photos/shell_eco-marathon/

About Shell Eco-marathon

Shell Eco-marathon began in 1939 at a Shell research laboratory in the United States as a friendly wager between scientists to see who could get the most miles per gallon from their vehicle. The winner of that contest barely achieved 50 mpg (21 km/l), and from these humble origins, a more organized competition evolved. In 1985 in France, Shell Eco-marathon as we know it today was born.

In April 2007, the Shell Eco-marathon Americas event was launched in the United States, and in 2010, the inaugural Shell Eco-marathon Asia was held in Malaysia, up until 2013. Since 2014, the event has been held in Manila, Philippines, which will continue to host the event until 2016.

Royal Dutch Shell plc

Royal Dutch Shell plc is incorporated in England and Wales, has its headquarters in The Hague and is listed on the London, Amsterdam, and New York stock exchanges.  Shell companies have operations in more than 70 countries and territories with businesses including oil and gas exploration and production; production and marketing of liquefied natural gas and gas to liquids; manufacturing, marketing and shipping of oil products and chemicals and renewable energy projects. For further information, visit www.shell.com.

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(g) environmental and physical risks; (h) risks associated with the identification of suitable potential acquisition properties and targets, and successful negotiation and completion of such transactions; (i) the risk of doing business in developing countries and countries subject to international sanctions; (j) legislative, fiscal and regulatory developments including regulatory measures addressing climate change; (k) economic and financial market conditions in various countries and regions;

(l) political risks, including the risks of expropriation and renegotiation of the terms of contracts with governmental entities, delays or advancements in the approval of projects and delays in the reimbursement for shared costs; and (m) changes in trading conditions. All forward looking statements contained in this announcement are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained or referred to in this section. Readers should not place undue reliance on forward looking statements.

Additional factors that may affect future results are contained in Shell's 20-F for the year ended 31 December 2014 (available at www.shell.com/investor and www.sec.gov). These factors also should be considered by the reader.  Each forward looking statement speaks only as of the date of this announcement, March 2016. Neither Shell nor any of its subsidiaries nor the Shell Group undertake any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward looking statement as a result of new information, future events or other information.

In light of these risks, results could differ materially from those stated, implied or inferred from the forward looking statements contained in this announcement.

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